Top 10 Barbados Facts in Barbados History That Will Amaze You6 min read

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Here are the top 10 things about Barbados that you never knew. But before we delve into these amazing facts about Barbados, let’s dissect its flag. The first thing you will probably notice about the flag of Barbados is that there is a freaking trident on it commonly referred to as the broken trident. It represents the nation of Barbados breaking away from the historical constitutional ties as a former British colony. The three points represent the three principles of democracy government of, for and by the people. The vertical band of gold representing the sands of Barbados’s beaches while the blue represents the sea and the sky of Barbados.




Barbados is located in the Atlantic Ocean just east of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean. You might think Barbados is part of the Caribbean but that’s wrong because technically it’s located a hundred miles away in the Atlantic Ocean. However, Barbados is often considered as part of the Caribbean by pretty much everybody.
Barbados is kind of awkwardly stuck between the Caribbean and Atlantic. A lot of people say that the shape of Barbados looks like a pear or a leg of mutton, well, I personally think it looks like a thumbs up just without any of the other fingers. In terms of its borders, Barbados is just one single island. The total land area is about 430 square kilometers and has a coastline length of about 97 kilometers. This means that one can drive around the entire island in less than a day.

The capital of Barbados is Bridge Town located in the southwest part of the Island and the country is divided up into 11 parishes and in each parish, you can find delightfully named towns like “Friendship and Pi corner”. Unlike of the many other islands in the area, Barbados is made up of over 85% coral limestone. Barbados is also unique in that its geographic location avoids catastrophe very well. Let’s elaborate, first of all if you look at the map all the other islands of the Lesser Antilles form an arc alongside a tectonic plate and are like volcanic stuff.

Barbados is way out on the east and does not have any volcanoes and on top of that it’s outside of the hurricane belt meaning that most hurricanes generally miss or barely grazed Barbados. Barbados just like many of the other Caribbean islands generally has a flat surface and a lot of the land is arable however, the country isn’t dependent on agriculture anymore. Before the 1950s Barbados was kind of like on a sugar high.

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Sugar production dominated the economy but like most sugar producing countries the prices of sugar dramatically fell. Fortunately, Barbados was smart and shifted its focus to other means of revenue like tourism, business and like many other adorable islands focused on offshore banking sectors as they decided to become kind of somewhat a tax haven which drew in tons of international investors.

Barbados has some beautiful beaches, coral reefs and caves but they’ve always been huge fans of Rum. In fact Barbados is home to the oldest rum distillery in the world which opened up in the piratey years of the early 1700s. There’s a saying that Barbados has as many churches as rum shops and to this day, rum alone makes up about 9% of the entire economy. Most of the room was made from whatever leftover sugar.

Barbados has about two hundred eighty-five thousand people or a few more than Vanuatu. 90% of all Barbadians are of Afro-Caribbean descent or mixed descent and the remaining 10% of the population include groups of Europeans along with Asians. As mentioned before there are lots of churches in Barbados as 95 percent of population identifies as Christian of which 70 percent are regularly active.

The largest denominations are Anglican and the other branches like Methodists and Baptists. Barbadians are known to live long as Barbados and Japan have the highest per-capita occurrences of Centenarians in the world. Barbados is the only country in the Caribbean to have been a colony of the British Empire for over 300 years which is why it is affectionately called sometimes as little England. English is the official language but with a distinguishable subtle Barbadian dialect known as Bagan. Located in the southwest part of the country is bridge town the capital which has a little bit more than a third of the population.

Bridgetown keeps it old-school as they like to maintain a lot of their colonial buildings from a long time ago. Also, if you travel to Barbados you’ll most likely return as they have the highest repeat visitor factor in the region at 39% mainly because Barbadians are so super nice and friendly also it’s so great to visit as it’s one of the only places in the world that George Washington ever traveled outside of the US.

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Culturally, Barbadians enjoy a lot of steel-drum calypso music, carnival and they have a harvest festival called “Crop over” and more recently Rihanna’s birthday has actually become a very important day for Barbados. Barbadians are flying fish fanatics, they have flying fish coins, flying fish sculptures, flying fish under their coat of arms, flying fish Holograms on their passports and are even known as the land of the flying fish.



The national dish of Barbadian is the cuckoo which is a paste made out of cornmeal, okra and flying fish. They love flying fish so much that they eat them as you do with everything that you love. Barbados loves people for the most part they have great relationships with all of their neighbors especially the ones in the CARICOM community as Barbados was a founding member of CARICOM. Many Barbadians actually also have family members in many of these island nations. They have six official on-site embassies for other countries but also have many off-site embassies for countries like Colombia, Denmark and France hosted in other countries like Jamaica, Mexico and Belgium.

Barbados have nearly 20 consulates in other countries. When it comes to the UK not only do they have a tight historical relationship but also a modern-day diplomatic one that displays a great cultural affection. Barbados is a Commonwealth country with Queen Elizabeth as technically the head of state. To this day Barbados has more British nationals living in it than any other country in the Caribbean and the third in the Americas after the US and Canada.

In terms of their best friends, they more or less might consider Trinidad and Tobago granted in the past they did have territorial disputes over maritime boundaries and there was that one song that Mac Fingal wrote that kind of pissed off the Barbadians when he said Barbados was part of Trinidad Tobago. All that aside Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago got along amazingly well and love to see each other whenever the opportunity comes for them to visit. The two countries signed an agreement to construct a 177-mile-long liquid natural gas pipeline between the two to share resources and energy.